[dev] FRR Technical Meeting Notes - 02/27/2018

Lou Berger lberger at labn.net
Fri Mar 2 12:45:40 EST 2018



On 2/27/2018 2:49 PM, Quentin Young wrote:
> There’s two EOL dates in the table. Let’s not pretend that 1 of them 
> is the ’true' EOL date.
>
> +---------------------+----------------------+
> |    Full Updates |    May 10th, 2017    |
> +---------------------+----------------------+
> | Maintenance Updates |  November 30th, 2020 |
> +---------------------+----------------------+
>
> Here is what I propose, since the majority of platforms follow 
> something like the above, roughly:
>
> - “Full Updates” period, where packages are actively updated, new 
> features, new kernels etc
> - “Maintenance Updates” i.e. only back porting security fixes / 
> critical bug fixes
>
> For whatever the platform in question is, we do the same thing. 
> Continue to ship updated FRR packages for platforms in the “Full 
> Updates” phase. Then once they enter the “Maintenance Updates” phase 
> we freeze the package at whatever version it is, or close to it 
> depending on convenience, and then only back port security fixes / 
> critical bug fixes.
>
> Does this sound reasonable to everyone?
At first glance, yes.

But what does this really mean in practical terms, *we* don't expect to 
support an FRR release for more than say about year right?

Are you saying we now need to keep old releases around for as long as we 
have a platform on which we're doing Maintenance Updates?  (For example, 
3.0 untilNovember 30th, 2020)

What's your thinking / proposal here?

Lou

On Feb 27, 2018, at 2:31 PM, Lou Berger <lberger at labn.net 
<mailto:lberger at labn.net>> wrote:
>>
>> Right. It says:
>> Maintenance Updates2 
>> <https://wiki.centos.org/About/Product#fndef-a91b3c0c287c782f9af063daff9e64b566d648c7-1> 
>> November 30th, 2020
>>
>> On February 27, 2018 2:20:24 PM Quentin Young 
>> <qlyoung at cumulusnetworks.com <mailto:qlyoung at cumulusnetworks.com>> wrote:
>>
>>> As Donald said in his email,
>>>
>>>>> We are just trying to match what the EOL is from the centos 
>>>>> website itself.
>>>
>>> https://wiki.centos.org/About/Product
>>>
>>>> On Feb 27, 2018, at 2:15 PM, Lou Berger <lberger at labn.net 
>>>> <mailto:lberger at labn.net>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> fair point, based on a quick google:
>>>>
>>>> https://linuxlifecycle.com/
>>>>
>>>> CentOS 6 (released 10 Jul 2011, EOL 30 Nov 2020)
>>>>
>>>> Lou
>>>>
>>>> On 2/27/2018 2:01 PM, Donald Sharp wrote:
>>>>> Isn't that Redhat, not centos 6?  Different distributions.  We are
>>>>> just trying to match what the EOL is from the centos website itself.
>>>>>
>>>>> donald
>>>>>
>>>>> On Tue, Feb 27, 2018 at 1:34 PM, Lou Berger <lberger at labn.net 
>>>>> <mailto:lberger at labn.net>> wrote:
>>>>>> Thanks for the notes!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On 2/27/2018 12:56 PM, Quentin Young wrote:
>>>>>>> - Seeing as Centos 6 went EOL in May 2017, it is no longer 
>>>>>>> supported; to
>>>>>>> be
>>>>>>>   noted in docs
>>>>>>
>>>>>> umm, per https://access.redhat.com/support/policy/updates/errata
>>>>>>  Linux 6, EUS 6.7 (ends December 31, 2018)
>>>>>>  V6 End of Maintenance Support 2 (Product retirement): June 30, 2024
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I know of a fair number of folks still using 6.x, I think EOL 
>>>>>> support is
>>>>>> premature.
>>>>>> I think FRR support is needed through *at least* the end of this 
>>>>>> year.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Lou
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
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>>>>>> dev at lists.frrouting.org <mailto:dev at lists.frrouting.org>
>>>>>> https://lists.frrouting.org/listinfo/dev
>>>>
>>>>
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>>>
>

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